Dionysian~Light

Wine, women, and song. Art, beauty, and life. Liberty, ecstasy, and recipes for really tasty drinks. Women may be naked, beauty may be subjective, and ecstasy is not a chemical. Eleleu! Iou! Iou!

Philokalia:: My blog devoted to beauty, mostly that of the Aphrodisian sort (read: beautiful women, naked or otherwise, no direct Dionysian relevance)

JackTHorn's Drifting Life:: My personal blog, just stuff from and about me, stuff I like.

The Threefold Path:: My blog devoted to Hekate Tri Via and all Her other forms, lady of the mysteries.

Saturnian Shadow:: My blog devoted to Kronos / Saturn, as a balancing weight and antidote for the dissipative helium of Dionysos.
The consequence of having seen God is madness, not in the sense that one becomes mentally ill, no, but that a kind of madness is set between you and others: people cannot nor will not understand you. Kierkegaard Provocations 388 (via theerrand)

(via lightningilluminates)

animus-inviolabilis:

Marble relief of Dionysos accompanied by a panther
2nd Century A.D.
Photographed by Roloff Beny
The world man knows, the world in which he has settled himself so securely and smugly—that world is no more. The turbulence which accompanied the arrival of Dionysos has swept it away. Everything has been transformed. But it has not been transformed into a charming fairy story or into an ingenuous child’s paradise. The primeval world has stepped into the foreground, the depths of reality have been opened, the elemental forms of everything that is creative, everything that is destructive, have arisen, bringing with them infinite rapture and infinite terror. The innocent picture of a well-ordered routine world has been shattered by their coming, and they bring with them no illusions or fantasies, but truth.
~Walter F. Otto, “Dionysos: Myth and Cult,” 1933.

animus-inviolabilis:

Marble relief of Dionysos accompanied by a panther

2nd Century A.D.

Photographed by Roloff Beny

The world man knows, the world in which he has settled himself so securely and smugly—that world is no more. The turbulence which accompanied the arrival of Dionysos has swept it away. Everything has been transformed. But it has not been transformed into a charming fairy story or into an ingenuous child’s paradise. The primeval world has stepped into the foreground, the depths of reality have been opened, the elemental forms of everything that is creative, everything that is destructive, have arisen, bringing with them infinite rapture and infinite terror. The innocent picture of a well-ordered routine world has been shattered by their coming, and they bring with them no illusions or fantasies, but truth.

~Walter F. Otto, “Dionysos: Myth and Cult,” 1933.

(via wheredionysosdwells)

rafaelcoala:

Foto: Rafael Coala
modelo: Lívia Mercês
produção: Luanda Bacco
assistente:Rayana Azevêdo

(via lightningilluminates)

aneleh:


I am a painter, I paint my poems.
I sold this Kokopelli’s Dance, and I am very happy and smiling.

Kokopelli’s dance The humped-back flute playerplays in tune with the deep rhythms of life.His melody drifts over the parched landand weaves in and outof the daily livesof the waiting ones.
The poor hear his songand in their sorrowand sadness and despite their hesitant hopesthey plead for a good harvestor a healthy child.The sick hear the melodyas beautiful as the good earth is home,in tune with their hopes,lifting their anxious hearts;they pray for a good deathor at least a painless one.Kokopelli, himself broken,smiles at the people; he plays his fluteand the music rises abovethe tiredness of the dayas he leads them in the dance.They rise from their bedsand follow,slowly at first,step by faltering step,until they are onewith the Great Spirit -the author and giver of the song.But that was long agoin the before times.Now we live in a world without stories,a world full of science and knowledge of the ways of things.Now we embrace another povertyfor we have lost the Great Spirit,the deepness of things,and because we can’t hear the songno one dancesanywhereanymore. 
© Bryan Owen 2006
Kokopelli, the humpbacked flute player, was originally a prehistoric deity among the Native American tribes of the south-western United States. His image has been found carved or painted many hundreds of times in desert rock art.  Kokopelli was associated with both fertility and agriculture but in more recent times he has been adopted as a symbol of the southwestern United States as a whole. In New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Utah his image can be found almost everywhere.

aneleh:

I am a painter, I paint my poems.

I sold this Kokopelli’s Dance, and I am very happy and smiling.

Kokopelli’s dance
 
The humped-back flute player
plays in tune
with the deep rhythms of life.
His melody drifts over the parched land
and weaves in and out
of the daily lives
of the waiting ones.

The poor hear his song
and in their sorrow
and sadness
and despite their hesitant hopes
they plead for a good harvest
or a healthy child.

The sick hear the melody
as beautiful as the good earth is home,
in tune with their hopes,
lifting their anxious hearts;
they pray for a good death
or at least a painless one.

Kokopelli,
himself broken,
smiles at the people;
he plays his flute
and the music rises above
the tiredness of the day
as he leads them
in the dance.

They rise from their beds
and follow,
slowly at first,
step by faltering step,
until they are one
with the Great Spirit -
the author and giver of the song.

But that was long ago
in the before times.
Now we live in a world without stories,
a world full of science
and knowledge of the ways of things.
Now we embrace another poverty
for we have lost the Great Spirit,
the deepness of things,
and because we can’t hear the song
no one dances
anywhere
anymore. 

© Bryan Owen 2006

Kokopelli, the humpbacked flute player, was originally a prehistoric deity among the Native American tribes of the south-western United States. His image has been found carved or painted many hundreds of times in desert rock art.  Kokopelli was associated with both fertility and agriculture but in more recent times he has been adopted as a symbol of the southwestern United States as a whole. In New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Utah his image can be found almost everywhere.

(via rivertrickster)

detailsofpaintings:

Georg David Matthieu, Porträt der Anna Regina von Osthoff als Bacchantin (detail)
1760s

detailsofpaintings:

Georg David Matthieu, Porträt der Anna Regina von Osthoff als Bacchantin (detail)

1760s

(via wheredionysosdwells)